CV

DR. HEATHER ANN THOMPSON 

EDUCATION:

  • Princeton University.  American History, Ph.D., 1995
  • The University of Michigan.  History, M.A. (With Distinction), 1987
  • The University of Michigan.  History, B.A. (Highest Honors), 1987

PUBLICATIONS:

Books:

Articles in Refereed Journals:

Chapters in Books:    

  • “Criminalizing the Kids: The Overlooked Reason for Failing Schools.” In Michael B. Katz and Mike Rose, eds., Public Education Under Siege (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013)
  • From Researching the Past to Reimagining the Future: Locating Carceral Crisis, and the Key to its End, in the Long 20th Century,” In  The Punitive Turn: Race, Prisons, Justice, and Inequality (forthcoming, University of Virginia Press)
  • “Blinded by a “Barbaric” South: Prison Horrors, Inmate Abuse and the Ironic History of Penal Reform in the Postwar United States” in Lassiter and Crespino, ed. The End of Southern History? (Oxford University Press, 2009)
  • “All Across the Nation: Black Power Militancy in America’s Plants, Prisons, and Southern Piedmont, 1965-1975” in Kenneth Kusmer and Joe Trotter, eds, African American Urban History and Race Relations after World War Two (University of Chicago Press, 2009)
  • Author, book chapter. “The Midwestern Freedom Struggle and the Remaking of the Urban America: Lessons from Postwar Detroit” in Rusty Monhollen, ed., The Black Freedom Struggle in the Midwest (Palgrave, to readers)
  • “Mayor Coleman A. Young: Race and the Reshaping of Postwar Detroit,” in Roger Biles, ed. American Urban History, (Scholarly Resources Books, June 2002)
  • “Rethinking the Collapse of Liberalism: The Rise of Mayor Coleman Young and the Politics of Race  in Postwar Detroit,” chapter in David R. Colburn, and Jeffery Adler, eds., African American Mayors, (The University of Illinois Press, April 2001)
  • “Urban Uprisings: Riots or Rebellions,” chapter in David Farber and Beth Bailey, eds.The Columbia Guide to America in the 1960s.  (June 2001)
  • “New Autoworkers, Dissent and The UAW: Detroit and Lordstown,” chapter  in   Robert Asher and  Ronald  Edsforth, eds., Autowork, (New York: SUNY Press,  1995)

Guest Edited Journal Issues:

Newspaper/Magazine Articles:

Blogs:

Review Essays:

  • “Telling it Like it Really Was: Women’s Movement Activism and Movement Making in Postwar America.” Review essay of Kimberly Springer, Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 1968-1980 and Christina Greene, Women and the Black Freedom Movement in Durham, North Carolina Warriors in Reviews in American History. (March, 2006)
  • “Rescuing the Right.” Review of Lisa McGirr, Suburban Warriors in Reviews in American History (June 2002)
  • “Searching for Synthesis: Urban Rioting in Postwar America.” Review Essay. The Journal of Urban History. (March 2000)
Book Reviews:
  • Review of Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name (Doubleday, 2009). Against the Current  (Fall, 2011)
  • Review of Glenda Gilmore, Defying Dixie (Norton, 2007) in Labor: Studies in Working Class and Labor History (Fall, 2009)
  • Review of David Freund, Colored Property (University of Chicago Press, 2007) in Journal of Southern History (Spring, 2009)
  • Review of Henry Pratt, Churches and Urban Government in Detroit and New York, 1895-1999 (Wayne State University Press, 2004), in American Historical Review (March, 2006)
  • Review of Suzanne Smith, Dancing in the Streets: The Cultural Politics of Detroit, in Labor History  (Spring 2001)
  • Review of Frederick Siegel, The Future Once Happened Here, in Left History (Spring 2001)
  • Review of Timothy Minchin, Hiring the Black Worker, in Social History (January 2001)
  • Review of Mary Stolberg, Bridging the River of Hatred: The Pioneering Efforts of  Detroit Police Commissioner George Edwards, in The Michigan Historical Review (September 1999)
  • Review of Thomas Sugrue, The Origins of Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit,  in  Against the Current , (January/February, 1998)
  • Review of Leon Fink and Brian Greenberg, Upheaval in the Quiet Zone, in Pennsylvania History,  (January, 1991)

Manuscript Series Edited:

  • Justice, Power, and Politics. Series coeditor with Rhonda Y. Williams (Case Western Reserve). University of North Carolina Press. Acquisitions Editor, Brandon Proia. Spring 2010-present.
  • American Social Movements of the Twentieth Century. Series Editor. Routledge. Acquisitions Editor, Margo Irvin. Fall 2008-present. (Books already secured for this series include: Daryl Maeda, Rethinking Asian-Pacific American Activism inModern America, Marc Stein, Rethinking the Gay and Lesbian Civil Rights Movement,Yohuru Williams,  Rethinking the Black Power Movement, Marc Rodriquez, Rethinking Chicano Activism in the United States after WW II, Felicia Kornbluh, Rethinking the Disability Rights Movement, Lorrin Thomas, Rethinking the Puerto Rican Rights Movement Permilla Nadasen, Rethinking the Welfare Rights Movement, Simon Hall, Rethinking the Anti-War Movement, Annelise Orleck, Rethinking the Women’s Rights Movement; Elizabeth Faue, Rethinking the American Labor Movement; Ellen Spear, Rethinking the Environmental Movement, Andrew Achenbaum, Rethinking the Elderly Rights Movement.)

Works in Progress:

  • Heather Ann Thompson, “Black Activism Behind Bars: Toward a Rewriting of the American Civil Rights Movement.” American Historical Review (submitted and now being revised)
  • Heather Ann Thompson, Deep Cover: Surveillance and the Dismantling of Participatory Democracy in Postwar America  (Book Manuscript in Progress)
  • Heather Ann Thompson, “Surveillance and the Origins of Carceral state.” (article in progress)

Documentary Films:

  • Historical Advisor, film being made by Bard Prison Initiative
  • Historical Advisor, film And Still I Rise, by Henry Louis Gates. PBS produced.
  • Contributor to documentary in progress for PBS tentatively titled, “Incarceration Nation.”
  • Historical Consultant and Interviewee for documentary on the Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 done by Emmy award-winning filmmakers Christine Christopher and David Marshall. Title: “Criminal Injustice: Death and Politics at Attica.” (Blue Sky Films, 2013)
  • Historical Advisor for documentary on Algiers Hijacking of 1972 by Maia Weschsler. Title: “Melvin and Jean: An American Story.” (2013)
  • Consultant and Interviewee in National Geographic documentary on the Attica Prison Uprising of 1971. “The Final Report: Attica Prison Riot.” 2006\

 AWARDS AND HONORS:

  • Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and its Legacy
    • The Pulitzer Prize in History, 2017
    • The Bancroft Prize in American History and Diplomacy, 2017
    • The Ridenhour Prize, 2017
    • The J. Willard Hurst Prize in Socio-Legal History
    • Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist 2017
    • Finalist Silver Gavel Award For Media and The Arts (Honorable Mention, May, 2017)
    • New York City Bar Association Award 2016, Outstanding Contribution In The Field Of Public Information
    • National Book Award Finalist 2016
    • New York Times Most Notable Books of 2016
    • Top Ten Best Books of 2016 Publishers Weekly
    • Top Ten Best Works Of Non Fiction of 2016 Kirkus Reviews
    • Top Ten Books of 2016 Newsweek
    • Best Human Rights Books of 2016
    • Best History Books of 2016 Bloomberg
    • Best Books of 2016 Boston Globe
    • Best Non Fiction Books 2016 Christian Science Monitor
    • Favorite Books 2016 Buffalo News
    • Top Ten Non-Local Books of 2016 Baltimore City Paper
    • Best Books 2016 The Undefeated
    • Best Criminal Justice Books 2016 The Marshall Project
    • Best Nonfiction Books 2016 Book Scrolling
    • Curator Pick Best of 2016, The Smithsonian
    • Best Books of 2016, Tropics Of Meta
    • Starred Reviews: Kirkus Review, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal
    • Finalist for 2015 J. Anthony Lucas Award for Best Work-in-Progress in Non-Fiction. The Columbia School of Journalism. March, 2015
  • Finalist for 2014 Just Media Award for Magazine Article: “How Prisons Change the Balance of Power in America.” The Atlantic. October 7, 2013. National Council for Crime and Delinquency. (winner announced October, 2014).
  • Appointed Distinguished OAH Lecturer. Organization of American Historians. 2013.
  • Havens Center Visiting Scholar at University of Wisconsin-Madison during 2012-2013.
  • Most Distinguished Scholarly Article Award for “Rethinking Working Class Struggle Through the Lens of the Carceral State: Toward a Labor History of Inmates and Guards,” Labor: Studies in Working Class History of the Americas (Fall, 2011). Awarded by the Labor Movements Section. The American Sociological Association.
  • Best Article in Urban History 2011 Award for “Why Mass Incarceration Matters: Rethinking Crisis, Decline, and Transformation in Postwar American History,” Journal of American History (December, 2010). Awarded by Urban History Association.
  • The Soros Justice Fellowship. The Open Society Institute. 2006-2007
  • The Franklin Research Grant, The American Philosophical Association. 2005
  • The Hackman Research Residency Grant, The New York State Archives. 2004
  • Littleton-Griswold Research Grant, American Historical Association. 2004
  • The Rockefeller Foundation, the Rockefeller Archive Center Research Grant. 2004
  • The National Endowment for the Humanities, Research Fellowship. 2000-2001
  • The University of North Carolina at Charlotte: National Endowment for the Humanities, Focus Grant: “African American Identity.” 2004; Senior Faculty Research Grant, 2003-2004, 2006-2007; “Teaching American History” Grant U.S. Department of Education. Partnership between Charlotte Mecklenberg Schools and University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 2002-2005;     CID Grant. Faculty Stipend Award for: The Digital Sound Archive Initiative, 2001; Junior Faculty Summer Research Grant, 2000; Junior Faculty Summer Research Grant, 1999; NEH Latin American Studies Initiative Course Development Grant, 1998-99; Junior Faculty Summer Research Grant, 1998; Faculty Research Support Grant, 1998
  • Princeton University: The Rollins Prize, 1990, 1991;The Shelby Collum Davis Merit Prize, 1987, 1988, 1989; Princeton University Fellowship Award, 1987-1992

EMPLOYMENT:

  • The University of Michigan
    • Professor of History in the Department of Afro-American Studies, The Residential College, and The Department of History. Fall 2015-
  • Temple University
    • Associate Professor of History in the Department of African American Studies and the Department of History. August 2009-present
      • Appointed Associate Director, Center for the Humanities (CHAT). August 2010-present
      • The University of North Carolina at Charlotte
        • Associate Professor. Department of History.  August 2002-July 200
          • Affiliated faculty Department of Africana Studies, 2004-July 2009
          • Appointed to faculty in Public Policy Ph.D. program, 2004-July 2009
          • Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Spring 2009)
      • The University of North Carolina at Charlotte
        • Assistant Professor. Department of History.  August 1997-August 2002
      • The University of Michigan
        • Visiting Assistant Professor. Joint Appointment, the Department of History and Residential College. Fall 1995- Summer 1997

INVITED TALKS:

**see book tour schedule link for talks not listed here.

  • Guest Speaker. Slavery, Race, Revolutionary Abolitionism Yesterday and Today. Collège d’études mondiales/FMSH. Fondation Maison des sciences de l’homme. May 17, 2017
  • Guest Speaker. Why Mass Incarceration Matters. New York University. April 21, 2016
  • Keynote speaker. Inner City Violence in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Central Washington University. April 14, 2016
  • Guest Speaker. Social Justice, Fostering Humanity. Redeeming the American City Symposium. University of Michigan Law School. March 11, 2016
  • Guest Speaker. Why Mass Incarceration Matters. Harvard University, Kennedy School. March 9, 2016
  • Guest Speaker. Why Mass Incarceration Matters in the Field of American History. The University of Zurich. Zurich, Switzerland. February 28, 2016
  • Keynote speaker. Mass Incarceration. 36th Annual Marion Wright Thompson Lectures. Rutgers University, Newark. February 20, 2016
  • Guest Speaker. Why Mass Incarceration Matters. Tarleton State University. February 11, 2016
  • Guest Speaker. Why Mass Incarceration Matters. University of Texas, Arlington. February 10, 2016
  • Keynote Speaker. Inner City Violence in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Osher Life Long Learning. Violence in America series. University of Michigan. January 26, 2016
  • Guest Speaker, Civil Rights and the Carceral State in the Clinton Years. Old State House. Little Rock, Arkansas. November 17, 2015
  • Guest Speaker. Why Mass Incarceration Matters. The University of Toronto. Toronto, Ontario. November 2, 2015.
  • Guest Speaker, Women and Mass Incarceration. Roundtable for Piper Kerman’s Shaw Lecture. The University of Michigan. October 12, 2015
  • Congressional Staff Briefing on Mass Incarceration. Washington, DC. October 9, 2015
  • Guest Speaker, Why Mass Incarceration Matters to North Carolina. North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Issues. October 1, 2015
  • Guest Speaker. Engaging Race: The Carter G. Woodson Forum on Violence, Citizenship, and Social Justice. University of Virginia. August 27, 2015
  • Keynote Speaker: Legislator Forum. Straight Talk on Crime and Punishment. The Riley Institute. Furman University. July 21, 2015
  • Keynote Speaker, “The Resilience of White Privilege in the United States since the New Deal” Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Germany. June 8, 2015
  • Guest Speaker, “The American Carceral State: Rethinking Exception and Rule.” Cambridge University. Cambridge, UK. May 15, 2015.
  • Guest Speaker, “Mass Incarceration in America: The New Global Regime?” University of Zurich. Zurich, Switzerland. May 13, 2015
  • Guest Speaker, Collins College. Plano, Texas. April 10, 2015
  • Guest Speaker, Texas Christian University. Ft. Worth, Texas. April 8-9, 2015
  • Guest Speaker, Policing Race. Police Profiling: Causes and Consequences. Center for Race and Ethnicity and Center for Public Policy. Brown University. March 10, 2015
  • Guest Speaker, A History of Penal Regimes in Global Perspective, 1800-2015. Symposium. Harvard University. March 5-7 2015
  • Guest Speaker, “Why Mass Incarceration Matters.” The University of Hawaii, Manoa. February 27-March 3, 2015.
  • Guest Speaker, “Capitalism and the Carceral State.” Histories of American Capitalism Conference. Cornell University.  November 8, 2014
  • Guest Speaker. The Politics of Mass Incarceration in the Age of Retribution.” The Scope of Slavery: Enduring Geographies of American Bondage Conference.  Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University November 7, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker. Symposium on Inequality. Washington University. St. Louis, MO. October 24, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker, “Fighting a War on Poverty and Waging a War on Crime: Rethinking the Welfare State/Carceral State Divide.” War on Poverty Symposium. University of Pennsylvania. September 19, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker, “Distorting Democracy in the Age of Mass Incarceration.” Lycoming College. September 16, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker, “Why History Matters to Current Incarceration Crisis.” Congressional Briefing. Senate Judiciary Committee. September 12, 2014
  • Guest Speaker, “Causes and Consequences of High Rates of Incarceration.” Briefing. John Jay College. September 4, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker, Summer Institute on Inequality. University of Pennsylvania. June 20, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker, “Learning from Detroit: Turbulent Urbanism in the 21st Century.” Conference. The University of Michigan. May 29-30, 2014
  • Guest Speaker, “Why Mass Incarceration Matters to our Democracy.” Interfaith Organizing Initiative, Summit on the Intersection of Criminalization and Race. Chicago, Illinois. May 8-9, 2014
  • Guest Speaker, “Race, Law, and the American State,” Symposium. The University of Michigan School of Law.  April 26, 2014
  • Keynote Speaker. Towson University. April 24, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker. Yale University. April 8, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker. Rutgers University, Camden. April 2, 2014.
  • Opening Speaker. Breaking Down the Walls. School of Social Work. University of Pennsylvania. March 29, 2014.
  • Keynote Speaker, College of Saint Rose. Albany, NY. March 20, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker. Yale University. March 19, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker. University of Maryland, College Park. March 13, 2013.
  • Guest Speaker. UCLA Institute for Research and Employment’s 2014 conference: “Race, Labor and the Law.” February 28, 2014
  • Guest Speaker. Connecticut College. February 24, 2014.
  • Keynote Speaker. “Racial Formation, Racial Blindness.”  Conference. Department of History, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. February 14, 2014
  • Guest Lecturer. “The Moral and Ethical Costs of Mass Incarceration in America.” The Ethical Humanist Society of Philadelphia. February 9, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker. Forum on Mass Incarceration. Muhlenburg College. January 23, 2014.
  • Keynote Speaker. ““Lock Up America: Why Mass Incarceration Matters To our Cities, our Economy, and our Democracy.” Searchlight Lecture Series. Eastern State Penitentiary. January 7, 2014.
  • Guest Speaker, Department of History, Oxford University, Oxford, England. November 19, 2013
  • Guest Speaker, Department of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, England. November 14 2013
  • Guest Speaker, Department of History, Cambridge University, Cambridge, England. November 11, 2013
  • Keynote Speaker, Pennsylvania History Association Annual Conference. Gettysburg, PA. October 19, 2013
  • Guest Speaker, Department of History, Auburn University, Alabama. September 24, 2013.
  • Keynote Speaker. Conference: The American Racial State in the Long 20th Century. The University of Michigan. May 10, 2013.
  • Guest Speaker, “Criminal Justice Today.” The Friends of the St. Paul Public Library. April 30, 2013. St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Guest Speaker. Murphy Institute, Labor Breakfast. CUNY. New York, New York. April 19, 2013
  • Guest Speaker, “Why Mass Incarceration Matters to All of Us, and What We Can Do  About It.” Public Forum. The Duke Human Rights Center, The Sanford Public Policy School, Duke University. March 25, 2013.
  • Guest Speaker. “Attica, Attica, Attica! From the Possibilities of Prisoner Rebellion to the Problem of Punitive Justice Policy.” Duke University. March 25, 2013.
  • Visiting Scholar Lecture. “The Costs of the Carceral State.” The Havens Center. University of Wisconsin, Madison. February 19, 2013.
  • Guest Lecture. “Distorting Democracy: Rethinking Politics and Power in the Age of Mass Incarceration.” University of Wisconsin, Madison. February 20, 2013.
  • Guest Speaker, “Lock Up America: Why Mass Incarceration Matters To our Cities, our Economy, and our Democracy.” Bucknell University. February 13, 2013
  • Keynote Speaker, “Unmaking the Motor City in the Age of Mass Incarceration.” For the Detroit School Lecture Series. Regional and Urban Planning. The University of Michigan. February 8, 2013
  • Guest Speaker. James E. Beasley School of Law, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA. January 30, 2013
  •  Speaker, “Costs and Consequences of the Carceral State.” Symposium on Mass Incarceration. Tyler Art School. Temple University. November 27, 2012
  • Guest Speaker, “Prisons and the Politics of Punitive Justice Policy: Civil Rights and the 21st Century.” University of Mary Washington. October 24, 2012
  • Keynote Speaker. “Urban and Labor Affairs in a Time of Mass Incarceration.” The North American Labor History Conference. Wayne State University. Detroit, MI. October 18, 2012
  • Keynote Speaker.”Which Way Detroit? From Struggles for Civil Rights to the Crisis of Criminalization” University of Michigan, Dearborn. October 17, 2012.
  • Keynote Speaker. “Why Mass Incarceration Matters to Postwar Urban History.” Urban History Association. Annual Luncheon at Organization of American Historians Meeting.Milwaukee, Wisconsin. April 18-20, 2012
  • Guest Speaker, “From Researching the Past to Reimagining the Future: Confronting the Crisis of Mass Incarceration.” Symposium: A Beautiful Struggle: Transformative Black Studies in Shifting Political Landscapes, A Summit of Doctoral Programs. Northwestern University. Chicago, Illinois. April 12-April 14, 2012.
  • Guest Speaker, “Mass Incarceration and the Unmaking of Postwar America.” American History Workshop. University of California, Los Angeles. April 5, 2012.
  • Guest Speaker, “Rescuing and Remember Attica,” The New School. New York, New York. March 29, 2012.
  • Guest Speaker, “Why Mass Incarceration Matters to Social Workers.” Columbia University School of Social Work. February 26, 2012.
  • Guest Speaker, “Ending Today’s Carceral Crisis: Lessons from History.” Confronting The Carceral State: Activists, Scholars and the Exonerated Speak: A Symposium.Black Studies Program of the City College. New York City. February 14, 2012.
  • Guest Speaker, “From the White House to the State House to the Row House: Recasting the American Nation through the Politics of Punishment.” University of Sussex. Brighton, UK. February 10, 2012.
  • Guest Speaker, “Rethinking the American South and its Historical Legacy in the Age of Mass Incarceration” Queens University, Belfast, Ireland. February 8, 2012
  • Guest Speaker, “”Locked Up and Shut Out: Black Women and America’s (not so) Hidden Carceral Crisis” Queens University, Belfast, Ireland. February 6, 2012
  • Guest Speaker, “Debating Mass Incarceration and the “New Jim Crow.”Symposium.From Black Modern to Post Blackness: A Retrospective Look at Identity. Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis. November 9-11, 2011.
  • Guest Speaker, “Lock Up America: Rethinking our Nation’s Past and Present in the Age of Mass Incarceration” University of Wisconsin. Green Bay. Thursday, September 22,2011.
  • Guest Speaker, “Attica: Why it Matters.” Conference. 40 Years after the Attica Uprising: Looking Back, Moving Forward. University at Buffalo Law School, The Baldy Center for Law & Social Policy Monday, September 12 & Tuesday 13, 2011
  • Guest Speaker, “The Imprisonment of a Race.” One-day Conference. Princeton University. March 25, 2011.
  • Guest Speaker, “Race, Injustice, and the Challenge of Mass Incarceration for America’s Inner Cities.” Social Justice, Race and Profiling: An Intergenerational Think Tank. Social Justice Institute. Case Western Reserve University. November 19-20, 2010.
  • Keynote Speaker. “Redemption Redux? Southern Politics, Economy, and Society in the Age of Mass Incarceration.” 2010 Lecture Southern Association for Women Historians. The Southern Historical Association Annual Meeting. Charlotte, NC. November 4-7, 2010
  • Guest Speaker. “Commodifying Punishment in the American South: The Industry and Labor Consequences of making Crime Pay, 1970-Present.” Joint Luncheon of the Southern Industrialization Project (SIP) and the Southern Labor Studies Association (SLSA). Southern Historical Association Annual Meeting. Louisville, Kentucky. November, 2009.
  • Guest Speaker.  “America’s Second Prison Crisis: Locating the Origins of Today’s Race to Incarcerate, and the Key to its End, in the Long 20th Century.”  The University of Virginia’s Carter G. Woodson Institute symposium, The Problem of Punishment:  Race, Inequality, and Justice. April 16-17, 2009
  • Guest Speaker. “Rewriting the American Civil Rights Movement: Black Activism Behind Bars and its Legacy.” Conference. The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Future of Scholarship.” Sponsored by the Southern Oral History Project.University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.  April 2-3, 2009.
  • Guest Speaker. “The Attica Uprising of 1971 and the Creation of the Carceral State: Toward a Rethinking of the Fall of the Labor Movement and the Rise of the Right.” Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy. University of California,Santa Barbara. February 6, 2009.
  • Opening Plenary Participant. Cosponsored by the Center for Contemporary Black History at Columbia University: “Storm Warnings: Rethinking 1968, “The Year that Shook the World”. Fellow participants: Manning Marable, Peniel Joseph, Tom Sugrue, Michael Kazin, Jeremy Suri. Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting. March, 2008.
  • Guest Speaker. “From Romanticizing and Remembering to Researching and Reassessing: Rethinking the Attica Uprising of 1971 and the Legacies of Black Power.” 2nd Annual Conference, “New Perspectives in African American History and Culture.” UNC-Chapel Hill. April 12, 2008
  • Guest Speaker. “Spinning Rebellion: The Attica Prison Uprising, the Media, and the (Mis)Shaping of Working-Class Politics in Post-1970s United States.” Youngstown State University Center for Working-Class Studies 13th Annual Lecture Series 2007-2008. February 26, 2008.
  • Guest Speaker. The “Malcolm Lester Lecture” at Davidson University. September 26, 2007
  • Guest Speaker. “The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and its Legacy: Rescuing Prisoner Rights and Rethinking the Nation’s Prison Crisis.”University of California, Berkeley. Boalt School of Law. September 13, 2007
  • Guest Speaker, “Why History Matters: the Attica Prison Uprising of 1971, Prisoner Rights, and Justice Policy Today.” The Open Society Institute, Soros Justice Fellows Annual Meeting.New Orleans. June 12, 2007
  • Guest Speaker, “The Perilous Path from the Past to the Present: Rethinking the Current State of Justice Policy in America.” Sanford Institute for Public Policy.Duke University. April 25, 2007.
  • Guest Speaker, “Attica: The Civil Rights Movement Behind Bars and its Legacy.”University of North Carolina at Greensboro. March 1, 2007
  • Guest Speaker, “The Attica Uprising of 1971: From Civil Rights Dreams to Prison Policy Nightmares.Wake Forest University.February 28, 2007.
  • Guest Speaker, “Attica: The Civil Rights Movement Behind Bars.”Rutgers University. October 26, 2006
  • Guest Speaker, “No Truth, No Justice: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and the Politics of the Ironic in Postwar America.”Princeton University. Modern America Workshop. October 25, 2006
  • Guest Speaker, “The Attica Uprising of 1971: Rescuing the Past and Reclaiming the Future.” The University of Pennsylvania Law School. October 16, 2006.
  • Guest Speaker, “Attica! Attica! Attica!: Rebellion, Reaction, and the Legacy of Truths Untold” The University of Michigan. September 21, 2006.
  • Guest Panelist. “Getting at Black Power History Sideways and Upside down: New Approaches to, and Understandings of, the Movement.” Metropolitan History Workshop. The University of Michigan. September 22, 2006.
  • Guest Speaker. “Rethinking Prison Conditions and Prisoner Abuse in Modern America: Toward a Labor History of Inmates and Guards.” Annual Luncheon of the Labor and Working Class History Association. The Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting.Washington,D.C.  April, 2006.
  • Guest Speaker. “Blinded by the ‘Barbaric’ South: Prison Horrors, Inmate Abuse and the Ironic History of Penal Reform in the Postwar United States.” Conference: “The End of Southern History?  Integrating the Modern South and the Nation.”Emory University. March 23-24, 2006
  • Guest Speaker: “Rage, Activism and Power: African Americans and the Remaking of the Motor City, 1945-1975.” 10th Anniversary Celebration. Center for African American Urban Studies and the Economy (CAUSE). September, 2005
  • Guest Speaker. “What Happened to Detroit?” Spotlight on Research Television Lecture Series. March 6, 2003
  • Guest Speaker. “Detroit Politics in the Sixties and Seventies: Tumultuous Past, Contested Legacy” The Institute for Detroit Studies. February 13, 2003
  • Guest Speaker. “Firing Up the Motor City: Polarization and Possibility in Detroit’s Auto Plants, 1965-1975. Eastern Michigan University Heritage Lecture Series 2003. February 12, 2003
  • Guest Speaker. “Southern Migrants and the Transformation of Shopfloors Politics in Detroit.” The 1999 Commonwealth Fund Conference, “Two Souths: Towards an Agenda for Comparative Study of the American South and the Italian Mezzogiorno.”London, England. January, 1999
  • Guest Speaker. “The Fight for Freedom on the Streets and Shopfloors of Postwar Detroit.” The Smithsonian  Institution, Program in African American Culture Conference, “The African American Freedom  Struggle in the Midwest.”Chicago,Illinois. October, 1998
  • Guest Speaker. “The Urban Impact of Restructuring in the Auto Industry: the Case of Detroit.” The International  Seminar on Economic and Social Development in the Greater ABC Region.Sao Paulo,Brazil. May,  1997

PAPERS PRESENTED/ROUNDTABLE PARTICIPATION: 

  • Roundtable. The Clintons. Southern Historical Association. Little Rock, AK. November, 2015
  • Roundtable. The Current State of Carceral State History. The Organization of American Historians Meeting. St. Louis, MO 2015
  • Roundtable. The Crisis of the 1970s. The American Historical Association Annual Meeting. New York City. January, 2015
  • Roundtable. Understanding the Protests in Ferguson. The American Historical Association Annual Meeting. New York City. January, 2015
  • Roundtable. “The Carceral State.” Social Science History Association. Toronto, Canada. November 6, 2014.
  • Roundtable. “Urban Cities in the Global Age.” Urban History Association Annual Meeting. October 12, 2014. Philadelphia, PA.
  • Roundtable. “Mass Incarceration in America.” The Association for African American Life and History. Memphis, Tennessee. September 26, 2014.
  • Roundtable Participant. Film Screening: “Criminal Injustice: Death and Politics at Attica.” Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting. San Francisco, CA. April, 2013
  • Roundtable Participant. “State of the Field: Historians and the Carceral State.” Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting. San Francisco, CA. April, 2013
  • Roundtable Participant. Film Screening: “Criminal Injustice: Death and Politics at Attica.” American Historical Association Annual Meeting. New Orleans, LA. 2013
  • Roundtable Participant. State of the Field: Carceral State and Prison Studies.” American Studies Association Annual Meeting. Puerto Rico. November, 2012
  • Panelist. “Criminalizing the Kids: Rethinking Poor Performance and Choice in America’s Urban Schools.” Conference. Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH). Baltimore, MD. November 17-20, 2011.
  • Panelist. “Why Mass Incarceration Matters: Rethinking Crisis, Decline, and Transformation in Postwar American History.” Symposium. Historians and the Carceral State: Writing Policing and Punishment into Modern U.S. History.” Rutgers University. March 5, 2009.
  • Panelist. “What do Prisons have to do with the fall of the Auto Industry?” Roundtable Participant. North American Labor History Association Annual Meeting. Detroit, Michigan. October, 2009.
  • Panelist. “Leading the Movement from Behind Bars: Rewriting the Struggle for Racial Equality in the United States 1965-1975.” Panel title: “Student Protests”?  The U.S., West Germany, and Poland in the 1960s-70s. American Historical Association Annual Meeting. New York City. January 2009.
  • Roundtable Participant. “On Trial Decades Later: The American Civil Rights Movement, Memory, and the Politics of Retrospective Justice.” Social Science History Association Annual Meeting.Chicago. November, 2007
  • Roundtable Participant. “Seeing the Forest Not Just the Trees: Towards a Synthetic History of Urban and Suburban Development in Postwar America.” New Directions in Urban and Suburban History. Pacific Coast Branch. American Historical Association. August 5, 2006.
  • Panelist. “Attica: Rebellion, Murder, and Justice Deferred.” The Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting.Washington,D.C.  April, 2006
  • Roundtable Participant. “Writing Attica Anew and Again.” Race, Roots, & Resistance: Revisiting the Legacies of Black Power Conference. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. March 30-April 1, 2006.
  • Roundtable participant. “New Directions in the Study of Black Power: From Oakland to Attica.” Annual Meeting Association for the Study of African American Life and History.Buffalo,New York. October 5-9, 2005.
  • Roundtable participant. “Radical Labor Activism: From Past to Present.” The Southwest Labor Studies Association Meeting.Santa Barbara,California. May 5, 2005
  • Panelist. “Beyond ‘Urban Crisis': Reexamining the political legacy of the Sixties in America’s inner cities.” Society for American Cityand Regional Planning History.St. Louis,Missouri. November 6, 2003
  • Roundtable Participant. “Global Politics and the American Labor Movement.” The North American Labor History Conference.Detroit,Michigan. October 16, 2003.
  • Roundtable Participant. “Autoworkers in the 1950s,” The North American Labor History Conference. October 17-19, 2002.Detroit,Michigan.
  • Panelist. “The Language of ‘Black Manhood’ and Worker Activism on Detroit’s Shop floors: 1968-1971,” The European Social Science History Association Meeting.Amsterdam,Netherlands. April 12-16, 2000
  • Panelist. “The Radical Roots of the Black Liberal Ascendancy.” The American Historical Association Annual Meeting.Chicago,Illinois. January, 2000
  • Panelist. “’A Ruling without Reason'; Black Militancy, Legal Liberalism, and White Disaffection with the Motor City, 1969-1973.”  Social Science History Association. Twenty-first Annual Meeting.New Orleans,Louisiana. October, 1996
  • Panelist. “Detroit Scholarship: Future Directions.” Roundtable Discussion Participant.  The Eighteenth Annual North American Labor History Conference. Wayne State University. Detroit,Michigan. October, 1996
  • Panelist. “Rethinking the Politics of White Flight in the Postwar City:Detroit, 1945-1980.” The Center for Recent United States History Conference–Contested Terrain: The Transformation of Postwar Political Culture, 1945-1955.  The University of Iowa. April 20, 1996
  • Panelist.  “Work Stoppages, Auto Worker Militancy and the State: the United States and Canada, 1950-1980.”  The Seventeenth Annual North American Labor History Conference,Wayne State University.Detroit,Michigan, 1995
  • Panelist. “The Disease of Racism: An African American’s ‘Insanity’ and Institutionalization.” The American Historical Association.Chicago,Illinois. January, 1995
  • Panelist. “Another War At Home: Autoworkers and Their Foremen on the Shop Floors of Detroit, 1963-1973.” The State Historical Society of Wisconsin Conference, “Towards a History of the  1960s.”Madison,Wisconsin. April, 1993

CONFERENCE COMMENT/CHAIR:

  • Chair of Session entitled, “Gender and Southern Prisons.” Southern Association of Women Historians. June 11-14, 2015. Charleston, South Carolina.
  • Chair of session entitled, “Genealogies of the Carceral State: Crime Policy, Crisis, Race, and Resistance in Twentieth-Century America.” American Historical Association Annual Meeting. New Orleans, LA. January 2012.
  • Comment on session entitled,“From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Rise of Punitive Policy at the Federal, State, and Local Levels.” Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting. Milwaukee, WI. April, 2011.
  • Chair and comment on session entitled, “Desegregating Backlash: Liberals and African Americans in the Making of Modern Conservatism.” Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting. Milwaukee, WI. April, 2011
  • Chair of session entitled, “Exploring Political Networks in the Post-Civil Rights Era.” American Historical Association Annual Meeting. Chicago, IL. January 2012.
  • Chair of session entitled, “”Black Children and Boundaries of Innocence, 1896-1968: Gendered Criminalization, Training ‘Productive’ Future Citizens, and Rural Hosting Programs as Sites of Racial Transformation.” 96th Annual Convention of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). October 5-October 9, 2011. Richmond, Virginia.
  • Chair of session entitled, “Politics and Policy in the Post-Civil Rights City.” American Historical Association Annual Meeting. January 6-9, 2011. Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Chair of session entitled, “Suburban Diversity, Civic Identity, and Racialized Politics in Postwar America.” Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting. April 7-10, 2010. Washington, DC. Chair and Comment of session entitled, “Forced Labor in the South after Slavery: the Longue Duree.” Conference on Race, Labor and Citizenship in the Post-Emancipation South College of Charleston, March 11-13, 2010
  • Chair of session entitled: “Rethinking the 1970s” the Long Civil Rights Movement in the Decade of Political Realignment. American Historical Association Annual Meeting. January 7-10, 2010.
  • Comment on papers read at session entitled “Struggles for Economic Justice in the post-1960s American South” Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting. March 26-29, 2009.
  • Chair of session entitled: “Reinventing Urbanity in Post-WWII America.” Urban History Association Meeting.Houston,Texas. November 5-8, 2008.
  • Chair of session entitled: “Urban Renewal across the Regional Divide: American Values and Redevelopment Practices in Post-World War Two American Cities.” The Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting.Memphis,Tennessee. March 29-April 1, 2007
  • Comment on papers read at session entitled, “Culture and Civil Rights in the Sixties and Seventies.” The Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting.Memphis,Tennessee. April 3-6, 2003
  • Comment on papers read at session entitled, “Breaking the Mold: Gender, Class, Region, Race and Union Organization: White Collar Workers and Class Identity in the Twentieth Century.” The Twenty-Third Annual North American Labor History Conference.Wayne State University.Detroit,Michigan. October 2001.
  • Comment on papers read at session entitled, White Collar Workers and Class Identity in the Twentieth Century.” The Twenty-Second Annual North American Labor History Conference. Wayne State University.Detroit,Michigan. October 2000.
  • Comment on papers read at session, entitled, “Made in Detroit: Local Histories, Local Politics.”  The American Studies Association.Detroit,Michigan. October 2000
  • Chair of session entitled, “New Perspectives on the New Deal.” The Graduate History Forum. University of North Carolina at Charlotte.Charlotte,North Carolina. March 22, 2000.
  • Chair of session entitled, “Working Class Narratives from the Post-IndustrialCity.”  The Twenty-First Annual North American Labor History Conference.Wayne State University. Detroit, Michigan. October, 1999
  • Comment on papers read at session entitled, “New Thoughts on the 1960s.” The Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting.Toronto,Ontario. April 22-24, 1999

ELECTED OFFICES:

  • President-Elect, Urban History Association, 2017
  • President, Southern Labor Studies Association, 2008-2009

BOARDS/COMMITTEES:

  • Diversity Scholars Network. Member. 2017-present
  • Editorial Advisory Board Member, Advances in Sustainability and Environmental Justice. Journal.
  • Partner/Speaker. Humanize the Numbers Project. The University of Michigan. 2015-2016
  • Advisory Board Member. Detroit Metropolitan Area Study Project. Institute for Social Research. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 2014-
  • Appointed, Humanities Scholar for the Humanities Action Lab’s nationally traveling, multi-platform public humanities project on the history and human experience of incarceration. The New School for Public Engagement. Consulting scholar for project April 2015 – January 2016.
  • Board Member, Labor and Working Class History Association, 2011-2014
  • Nominating Committee Member, Urban History Association, 2014-2017
  • Nominating Committee Member, Labor And Working Class History Association, 2013-2015
  • Advisory Board Member. Media and the Movement: Journalism, Civil Rights, and Black Power in the American South.  Duke University and the University of North Carolina’s Southern Oral History Program in the Center for the Study of the American South.
  • National Study Team Member. “The Causes and Consequences of High Rates of Incarceration in America.” Study funded by the National Academy of Sciences, The MacArthur Foundation, and the National Institute of Justice. Washington, D.C. Ongoing, 18 month study.
  • Appointed Advisory Panel Member, The Future of Work Initiative. Open Society Institute. New York City, NY. 2014
  • Advisor: Center for Community Change. 2014
  • Editorial Board Member: Journal of Human and Civil Rights (University of Illinois Press). 2014
  • Serving on panel of experts writing position paper on rebuilding the labor movement for the AFL-CIO: “The Future of Worker Representation.” Report to be presented to the AFL-CIO leadership at National Convention 2014.
  • Appointed Editorial Board, Journal of Social Criminology. 2014
  • Appointed Advisory Panel Member, Life of the Law Project. 2013
  • Board Member, Prison Policy Initiative, 2012
  • Member, Scholars Strategy Network. http://www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/
  • Appointed to Board of Contributing Editors,  Labor: Studies in Working Class History of the Americas,  2012-2015
  • Committee Chair, Liberty Legacy Foundation Award  for the best book by a historian on the civil rights struggle from the beginnings of the nation to the present. The Organization of American History. May 2013-May 2014.
  • Committee Member, Most Distinguished Scholarly Article Award Committee. Labor and Labor Movements Section, American Sociological Association. 2013.
  • Committee Member, Ellis Hawley Prize for best book on political institutions and political economy since the Civil War. The Organization of American Historians. May 2012-May 2013.
  • Committee Chair, Kenneth Jackson Award for Best Book in North American Urban History. Urban History Association, 2010.
  • Committee Member, Herbert Gutman Prize for Outstanding Dissertation. Labor and Working Class History Association, 2010-2011
  • Committee Chair, Nomination Committee. Southern Labor Studies Association, 2010-2011
  • President. Southern Labor Studies Association, 2007-2009
  • Appointed to Board of Contributing Editors,  Labor: Studies in Working Class History of the Americas,  2006-2009
  • Appointed to Advisory Board,Wayne State University Press: “African American Life Series,” 2004
  • Elected to Board of Directors, Urban History Association. January, 2003
  • Elected to Board of Directors, Labor and Working Class History Association. October, 2002

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS:

  • The Society of American Historians
  • The American Historical Association
  • The American Studies Association
  • TheAssociation for the Study of African American Life and History
  • The Labor and Working Class Studies Association
  • The National Council of Black Studies
  • The Organization of American Historians
  • The Social Science History Association (Criminal Justice Network)
  • The Southern Historical Association
  • The Southern Labor Studies Association
  • The Urban History Association

COMMUNITY/PROFESSIONAL BOARDS:

  • Member, Board of Directors. Eastern State Penitentiary, a Historical Site. Philadelphia, PA.